Week 2: The Trouble With Wilderness/The Meadowlands

The Trouble With Wilderness
Cronon highlighted what we talked about in class the first week about what wilderness is, but he also elaborated on how wilderness, the wilderness we imagine, is not related to nature. Cronon described the change in the “opinion” of nature – that it went from a negative and savage viewpoint to one that we, as a class, elaborated too immediately;  an untouched beauty. Cronon pulls onto many different resources, the bible being one. I enjoyed this article because Cronon didn’t suggest that only one part of nature should be preserved but that all of nature should be. Cronon allowed me to evaluate how I view the world around me, and how others should view the world around them and respect everything you pass – the trees, plants and anything nature to better the planet.
The Meadowlands
I did not know a whole lot about what the meadowlands were, so before reading the book I googled it (super techy). I gained some background knowledge that the meadowlands are off New Jersey, close to New York City and have changed over time, specifically changing due to the impacts of humans. The meadowlands are used as a dumping ground so you can imagine how toxic the area is and humans continually use it as a place to dump things instead of preserving it and no longer using it as a dumping ground.
I found the reading to be a little boring, but then again, I normally read murder mystery books and research papers, however, I didn’t hate it. It was something I had no trouble turning the pages for. 
Some quotes:
“this vilified, half-developed, half-untamed, much dumped-on, and sometimes odiferous tract of swampland is home to rare birds and missing bodies, tranquil marshes and a major sports arena, burning garbage dumps and corporate headquarters, the remains of the original Penn Station.” 
“Discharged liquefied animal remains” 
“Major pet company and Meadowlands development firm that drove so many steel girders into the ground that people joked Secaucus would become a new magnetic pole.” 
“In the mid-1980s, playing football in the Meadowlands meant possibly risking your life, because shortly after the stadium opened players for the Giants began developing cancer.”
“Major pet company and Meadowlands development firm that drove so many steel girders into the ground that people joked Secaucus would become a new magnetic pole.” 

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