Nature pt 2

I found it interesting that Coates starts and ends the book by talking about how nature and culture are opposites, but then in this section talks about how culture has shaped nature. I don’t think its at all possible to seperate them entirely, and i think Coates makes this clear but his statements at the beginning and end seem to go against it. I liked the notion of lands that were cultivated but for maximum stustinance and hunting ability without damaging the local ecosystsems, which he describes the native Americans doing. He very briefly mentioned a “wild garden”, and I like this idea because it implies a garden that is planted and left to do whatever it wants, which is my ideal kind of garden. Later on, Coates talks about Bill Mckibben and his ideas. While I don’t agree with his notion that nature is ireeperably damaged by human activity, I like his ideals a lot and I have read Deep Economy years ago, which was basically the book that made me realize capitalism isn’t all its cracked up to be. This author is important to me and I’m glad his relevant works were discussed in this book. I hated the theory he talked about where even environmental threats are social constrcuts because they don’t affect everyone equally. This is because of classism and the people at the bottom being disproportionately affected by environmental issues. To conclude, I loved that he finally came to the conclusion that what matters about nature isn’t how untouched it is, but how healthy it is. Nature can heal and we can help heal it, and after that it is no less valuable than nature that has never been affected by human activity.

Current Event: Legal Marijuana Sales Create Escalating Damage to the Environment

Marijuana legalization is a big issue that probably affects at least a few of us, and while it seems like the right way to go increased marijuana production will cause some environmental impacts. Cannabis is a touchy crop that requires specific light conditions and various fertilizers and pesticides. This can cause runoff into streams and waterways, damaging the ecosystem there. The plant also requires a lot of water, and illegal farming operations use enough water from local streams to harm those ecosystems. Even indoor operations use as much energy to keep the plants warm and keep the right lighting as Google data centers! Most of this information, though, was gathered from illegal growing operations, so it would be interesting to see how sustainable or not sustainable newer, legal operations are.

https://phys.org/news/2017-02-legal-marijuana-sales-escalating-environment.html

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