Cabin in the Woods

My Adventures in the Charahala National Park

Over fall break a couple of weeks ago, I was able to go to Tennessee and stay in the park in my friend’s cabin with her for the week. There was no cell service, Internet etc. We were way up in the mountains, high altitude in the Smokey Mountains. Everyday we went out exploring and taking her four-wheeler on some of the rough terrain vehicular trails. We saw the North Carolina border, and the sunset over the Smokey’s from a meadow, which is bald due to how high up we were trees are unable to grow, it was open space great for views overlooking the river. We were able to see bats, water snakes, wild turkeys, and even a boar. The river runs through their property so it was a great space to catch up on some reading, and taking naps.

Going to this relatively isolated location was great for practicing the retrieval of data collection for my project based in the Delaware area. Especially through such activities that fit these categories: ecolodging, ecotreking, and community development and other ones as well. The fish hatchery was good to show how the park is able to control of the Rainbow Trout population that is fished most seasons in the park in multiple areas. They were being protected and replenished, in clean, well-maintained constantly filtered boxes. They are also covered with metal fencing to keep people from easily stealing the fish, and some of the park rangers live in the hatchery so they are constantly being protected. Of the many stories heard about fish hatcheries and the cruel, cramped conditions they subjected to. I could find no evidence that such treatment was being utilized at this particular hatchery.

Watching the sunset on the  top of  the Bald Hill, overlooking the Smokey Mountains.

Watching the sunset on the top of the Bald Hill, overlooking the Smokey Mountains.

Some large Rhododendron bushes were among some of the plants I could identify.

Some large Rhododendron bushes were among some of the plants I could identify.

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