Meadowlands (9/2)

December 15, 2009

Robert Sullivan begins with a description of what seems to be a remote area that is undisturbed.

“When I leave the bus, I will often head for the towns around the edges of the swamp or for ancient industrial sites that are now rusting and fading away”14.
“Americas first west”14
“The city and its environs are bursting at its seams” “The Meadows must go”17
“Meadowlands as a new kind of place, neither urban nor suburban”17
An description really helps to form a visual of the Meadowlands-“rusting auto bodies, demolition rubble, industrial oil slicks and cattails merge in unholy sinking union”18
The contents in the Meadowlands continues to grow worse and worse throughout the book-“farmers would wash swill off their fields with fire hoses and that the adjacent meadows in turn became sopped with swill and manure”28
Snake Hill and the Meadowlands were once a place that was seen as wild and untapped but is now a place of pollution and filth.
As described by Sullivan it used to contain fields of various flowers and plant life and was a very visually attractive area.
The shoe industry really seemed to be one the first businesses to put out a large amount of waste from leather into the meadowlands.44
It soon became a place of toxins-“the four new antennae were each four hundred feet tall and buried in the marsh beneath each one were radial antennae, each of those jutting from the base of the tower every three degrees like the spokes of a submerged bicycle wheel”61
After the pollution increased the Meadowlands seemed to become a place that was hidden from the public or at least an attempt was made to do so.The walden swamp numbers I thought were so high that it would clearly deter people from exploring the area and therefore keep in covered up.
The valleys of garbage hills are very descriptive and give plenty of evidence as to why the mosquito problem was very severe in the area. The meadowlands is a place that was created by humans and turned out to be a place that produced various insects/toxins etc that are life threatening to people.
“In Newark alone, hundreds of people died every year from the disease from the swamp”111
The meadowlands also contains countless bodies that have been dumped and left to rot. It seems that the Meadowlands is a place that is only respected by a few and abused by many


Christian’s Digital Course Portfolio

December 15, 2009

Reading Notes:

Current Enviro Events:

Project Postings:

Final Report [pdf] Presentation: 12/9 Report Submitted: 12/15


Project Report

December 15, 2009

Connor McGowan
Stratford Ecological Center: Environmental Education Intern
12/15/09

“The Stratford Ecological Center is a non-profit organization dedicated to the education of
children and adults in understanding the relationships between living things and their environment,
thereby fostering an appreciation of the land and all life that depends on it. It provides hands-on
experiential education for individuals to learn ecological concepts, understand human ecology and gain
a reverence for the diversity, complexity and beauty of the natural world. It manages a diversified
working “family farm,” which demonstrates the lifestyle, techniques and principles of sustainable
agriculture, horticulture and forestry as well as promotes agroecological research. The Center also
strives to preserve the natural ecosystems of existing woods, streamsides, meadows and swamps
located on its 236 acre property.”

My final project was a detailed power point regarding sustainable agriculture and my experience
as an environmental education intern. In my presentation I covered a number of topics ranging from
organic laws and regulations that must be met in order to run an organic sustainable farm to feeding
cows and pigs each and every morning. In order for Stratford to remain a working organic farm they
must pass a yearly examination from the OEFFA. These examinations include anything from checking the
chicken feed to testing the water that is pumped into each field.

The second part of my presentation involved mainly information about my intern experience. As
an intern I would responsible for farm chores every morning and afternoon. I would also visit various
schools throughout the central Ohio area and speak in front of classes about Stratford and would then
lead these classes on educational hikes through Stratford’s farm and preserve land.
Stratford Ecological Center. Starting on September 8th of 2009 I was hired as an environmental education intern at a non-profit educational farm and nature preserve. My final project for Environmental Geography was a power point presentation that included detailed information about organic sustainable agriculture and my intern experience as a whole. I started my presentation with the Stratford mission statement which is, “The Stratford Ecological Center is a non-profit organization dedicated to the education of children and adults in understanding the relationships between living things and their environment, thereby fostering an appreciation of the land and all life that depends on it. It provides hands-on experiential education for individuals to learn ecological concepts, understand human ecology and gain a reverence for the diversity, complexity and beauty of the natural world. It manages a diversified working “family farm,” which demonstrates the lifestyle, techniques and principles of sustainable agriculture, horticulture and forestry as well as promotes agroecological research. The Center also strives to preserve the natural ecosystems of existing woods, streamsides, meadows and swamps located on its 236 acre property.” Following this I gave a brief overview of the staff at Stratford. These staff members did not receive enough credit in my presentation but were amazing people to work with and of them had an impact on my experience and also taught me more than I could have imagined. I then began to discuss my internship experience and what the internship consisted of. As an environmental education intern I was responsible for morning and afternoon chores which included feeding the chickens, cows, pigs, cats, goats, sheep, cats, chicks, and at times milking the goats. I also assisted with hygiene care which included trimming hooves and treating for foot rot. In addition I would travel each Monday and Tuesday to various schools in the central Ohio area on pre-visits. The pre-visits consisted of talking in front of classes, discussing what Stratford was along with their goals and also what the classes could expect on their visit. Each Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday the classes that had received pre-visits earlier in the week would come to Stratford and be led on guided tours by the interns.
My project also included information on sustainable organic farming as a business. Stratford in an organic self sustaining farm which means it uses no chemicals of pesticides on its plants or in its feed, and it is able to sustain itself year in and year out by maintaining the land. Sustainable agriculture integrates three main goals: environmental stewardship, farm profitability, and prosperous farming communities. I also included the organic certifications for livestock and produce that is required by the OEFFA for self-sustaining organic farms. (http://www.oeffa.org/certification.php)
Following the informational portion I went through a slideshow of pictures I had taken while at Stratford.

Appendix:
The majority of the information I used for my project was from personal experience while at Stratford. Each day brought something new and exciting which helped me to form my final project. While I was at Stratford I had contact with and every employee there and learned something different from each of them. The staff consists of Jeff Dickinson(farmer and director), Christa Hein(education director), Chris Byerly(Operations Manager), Jane Walsh(Volunteer Coordinator), April Hoy)Field Trip Coordinator, Mary Hilborn(Office Manager), and David Hoy(Development Director). While working at Stratford, everyday seemed to be an interview where I was gathering information. I learned how to care for the animals, what to feed them, how to treat them, what each of them needed, and how sustainable agriculture actually worked from Jeff Dickinson. I learned various teaching techniques and how to go about treating children of different ages and what I was expected to do from Christa Hein. The notes that I took were through experiences. The only information that I used that was outside of Stratford was the OEFFA certification (http://www.oeffa.org/certification.php) While at Stratford I also had to take a class on sustainable agriculture which was done via the internet through (http://www.sare.org/). This class was based on sustainable agriculture, various techniques, marketing strategies, cleanliness, animal care, produce care, etc.

I have a number of pictures from Stratford but cannot include them in this page because it is accessible
by anyone with the internet.
In the Spring of 2010, I plan on working at Stratford again, possibly in a slightly different position. As I said previously it was a great experience and something that I will never forget. Stratford is an amazing place and I hope in the near future there will be more and more places similar to Stratford.


Dylan’s Digital Course Portfolio and Project Summary

December 14, 2009

READINGS:

9/01 —Introduction: Dylan “0ats” Ewing/Are the meadowlands a wilderness?/my hometown

9/09 – Desert Solitaire

9/14 – Red: Notes

9/30 – Attitudes since Ancient Times:

10/07 – The unsettling of America: Human Sovereignity and “Living in the Future”

11/04 – Breakfast of Biodiversity

11/11 – Lawn People

CURRENT EVENTS/BLOG-ROLL:

9/07 – News of the Weird

9/16 – Microenvironment

10/04 – News…

10/06 – News:whales in japan

10/06 – news: light-pollution and OWU

10/21 – Town Hall Meeting

11/04 – Sea Slime

11/11 – sesame street goes green

11/18 – Porches: Hammocks, make your own

11/18 – White Nose; Declining Bat Populations Persists

11/18 – Honey Bees: Colony Collapse Disorder

PROJECT:

10/06 – News actually/maybe/not really

10/21 – Project idea as proposed from 09/09/09

10/21 – What Ive been thinking of since 09/09 proposal

11/18 – GUYS!!!!! HI, Dylan here

PROJECT SUMMARY —— 12/14


PROJECT SUMMARY

December 14, 2009

Dylan Ewing

12/14/09

Project Summary: Brewing Beer, is it a product of the environment?

BEER. The German purity laws state that only 4 ingredients go into it; water, malt, yeast, and hops.

Water is an important because it makes up more than 90% of the beer’s composition, thus it is relatively important to have water that is clean, as in not filthy. While better water makes better beer, it is not the most important ingredient because even some water and their impurities will be purified by the hops natural ability to do so.

Malt is the base oil the beer. May be viewed as the infrastructure. Malt is a syrupy, thick, molasses-like viscosity that is derived from germinated barley grain. It provides the main source o sugars that the yeast will consume, (maltose -à glucose by diastrose- natural enzyme in barley grain, glucose is digestible form of sugar for yeast) glucose molecules and convert them into Carbon dioxide and ethanol as waste products. Not much is known about yeasts but all yeasts for beer were originally derived from the immediate environment- Today, they are re-cultured and have been for hundreds f years (most of them).

Hops may arguably their most important ingredient. It provides the distinct flavors to a beer, naturally preserves and purifies the beer, and is the most effective ingredient when relating a beer’s composition to an environment. All oils and resins come from lupulin glands on the base of the flower’s petal, these release alpha and beta acids which are responsible for the beer’s distinctive flavor, purity, and preservative qualities.

I showed you guys how to make some home brew in a 15 min. video, this beer was an experimental approach to see if there was an observable difference in two identical beers; manipulated with two variables via hops and yeast. For two different beers made (an American Pale Ale and an English Pale Ale), the hops and yeast used were obtained from the two corresponding regions, as traditionally used in these regions.

The Recipe;

Both Ales:

-dried malt extract (2 lbs each)

-60L 2-row crystal grain (Barley) (10 oz each)

– Pale malt extract (3.3 lbs each)

– approx. 20 juniper berries and a sprig of juniper each

Manipulated variables:

English Pale Ale: 1 oz Target hops, 1 oz Kent Golding’s finisher hops, 1 packet of English ale yeast

American Pale Ale: 1 oz Centenniel hops, 1 oz Amarillo finisher hops, 1 packet American ale yeast

Yeasts make a profound influence on the taste of the beer and are derived from their environment, typically by leaving beer outside and awaiting for the microspores to land and colonize the sugary-solution, a direct influence of the environment. However, with modern technology, these yeasts are available all over the world now and have evolved very much with their short life-histories and fast reproduction/mutation rates. Thus , the English ale yeast of today is surely different from what it may have been 300 yrs. ago.

Hops have an even more profound influence on the taste of the beer. The alpha acid content is the source of this influence. The American hops, characteristic of the American Northwest, have a much higher alpha acid content than do the English, thus the American pale ale was one that was much more bitter, as opposed to the more mellow, aromatic flavor given by the English pale ale. Differences in oil and resin content also added to different flavors observed in the beer. The Amarillo hops of the American ale gave it a distinct citrus-grapefruit like flavor, while the finisher Kent Golding hops gave the English ale a mellow-citrus, more fruity kind of flavor.

CONCLUSION

Surely at some point in time, these hops and yeasts were direct products of their regional climates and soil compositions, however, the main point of this project was to stress that there is no ‘original’ environment in modern day. In order to create a beer that is a product of its environment would require extraordinary means, by which, one would literally have to seclude their self in the wilderness and be able to successfully grow their own ingredients and derive their own yeast. Even in such a scenario, the product would likely be undesirable and surely not your typical brew. Our environments are constantly changing, and so are the products that are derived from them. Like the evolution of people, habitats, and ecosystems, such products like beer, most certainly follow. In modern day, barley grains are grown in monocultures of hybrid/genetically modified variants, hops are hybridized/genetically modified and grown under climate controlled systems with fertilizers and supplements that do not mimic regional soils, yeasts are maintained and controlled in laboratory cultures, and beer in general is a result of mass transportation and a melting pot of cultures.


Matthew’s Digital Course Portfolio and Project Report

December 14, 2009

Links to Blog Postings

Reading Notes:

Current Events:

Project Postings (Porches)

Final Project Report (link to PDF file), presentation on 11/18; final report submitted 12/14/2009


Becca’s Digital Course Portfolio and Project Report

December 13, 2009

COURSE PORTFOLIO

Notes On Readings:

The meadowlands

Desert Solitaire

Red

Nature #1

Nature  #2

Unsealing of America

Breakfast of Biodiversity

Lawn People

Current events:

Hello My Name is Becca Kelly…

The Mound and Atomic Energy

It’s Blowing in the Wind My Friends

Trail Riding

80% Organic Cheddar Bunnies

Eco- Bunnies

Lawn, How Do I Love Thee? Let Me Count the Ways…

Corse Project:

Project #1

Conservation Education at ECC

PROJECT REPORT

Becca’s Final