project ideas

January 31, 2007

Possible project idea would be looking at the overpopulation of deer in suburban areas.  What steps are being taken to control the problem or what can be done.


PROJECT IDEA: AASHRAI SARIN

January 31, 2007

Hey all,                                                         imagescausx4g5.jpg

             I was looking into researching about the Maldive Islands, located in the Indian Ocean. The Maldives are a prominent vacation spot and getaway. Unfortunately, rising sea levels in the future threaten its very existence. The islands are predicted to sink within the next few decades. The idea behind my project is to research the area’s past, why it faces these problems, are there any solutions and possiblities to save the islands, what would become of its citizens, etc.

      Let me know what everyone thinks of my idea. Any comments are good…right?? 😉

some links:

 http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2004/08/27/1093518089914.html?from=storylhs

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/3930765.stm

http://www.futuremaldives.com/

http://www.jstor.org/view/00044687/di014319/01p0203b/0?searchUrl=http%3a//www.jstor.org/search/BasicResults%3fhp%3d25%26si%3d1%26Query%3dmaldives%2bfuture&frame=noframe¤tResult=00044687%2bdi014319%2b01p0203b%2b0%2cFF7F07&userID=ce1541df@owu.edu/01cc993326ef3311079815173&dpi=3&config=jstor

– Aash.


California May Ban Conventional Lightbulbs by 2012

January 31, 2007

     Under the soon to be propsed, “How Many Legistlatures Does it Take to Change a Lightbulb Act,” use of incadescent bulbs in California will be banned by the year 2012. These would be replaced by energy-saving comapct fluorescent lightbulbs (CFL’s).

     Incandescent lightbulbs have undergone little to no change since there development 125 years ago. They convert a mere 5 percent of the energy theyu recieve into light. Which is a trivial amount when compare to the 25 percent conversion of CFL’s. If this act were to pass, it would be another pioneering environmental effort in California. By 2005, CFL sales accounted for 5 percent of the 2 billion lightblub market. It is estimated that this number could more than double in the coming year.

     Use of CFL’s is highly recommended by the EPA. A spokesperson was quoted saying, “They save money and enery. They are more convenient that other alternatives and come in different sizes and shapes to fit almost any fixture.” CFL’s also produce 70 percent less heat in comparison to incadescent lightbulbs, and last 13 times longer. The California Energy Commission believes that the average household could save $40 to $50 per year if CFL’s replace the currently used incadescent bulbs.

LINK: http://www.enn.com/today.html?id=1234

-Aashrai


Project Ideas – Jeff

January 31, 2007

I would like to investigate the use of biogas plants as an alternative source for home heating/cooking. I would look at their current use in India and how they are designed. Also what is the best type of “fuel” to put into these plants that basically produce methane gas that is piped into the home.

http://www.ganesha.co.uk/Articles/Biogas%20Technology%20in%20India.htm

http://villageearth.org/atnetwork/atsourcebook/chapters/biogas.htm

A second project Idea would be to investigate the plant and animal species that are present in North America to see if there are any native species remaining or if our current biota is all introduced from other places, in a sense all of the species would be invasive. Most of our crops that we plant in the U.S. are not native to this land and were developed some where else and then introduced into this continent.  Also see how species ranges/distributionshave changed over time given the interactions between humans.

~Jeff


Jeff’s Response to the Meadowlands

January 31, 2007

I really enjoyed the book because I didn’t feel bogged down with a lot of facts, that it was just a combination of all the expeditions Sullivan had to the area. Also it opened my eyes to see that wilderness could be different for different people. It is in the eyes of the beholder. I never new that an old dump could be a nature experience to someone, but the book shows that as old as the meadow-lands are, they are so much to tell. Even being on old dump there is still life there. This area has been an attraction for outdoor TV shows because it holds a lot of wildlife mostly waterfowl and is situated just outside of New York city.

I also feel that the supplementary material went along very well with the book. I liked how Cronon expressed to us that wilderness is a human construct. There is no place in the U.S. that hasn’t been touch by humans. Most of the old growth forests are gone, and what we perceive as wilderness is just second growth. Humans also attach terms to anything in an attempt to describe it, and make it make sense for the human world. Wilderness is something humans build up so others have a place to visualize or go see. In fact, wilderness can be anything a person wants it to be. Just like the Meadow-lands; They were Sullivan’s wilderness and the place he missed the most when he wasn’t there. The meadows hold a lot of history and Sullivan attempted to learn about it and present it in a well organized fashion to the rest of the human world.

~Jeff


response to Meadowlands

January 31, 2007

I really enjoyed reading The Meadowlans and the other supplements because they tied in very well together because while reading The Meadowlands. My view of what I viewed as wilderness before reading the book I would have just viewed it as an old dump worth beyond trying to save and having no meaning to it. After reading it I have learned to enjoy and expand more of the unconventional wilderness. And the book gave me the urge to go The Meadowlands and find other hidden unconventional wilderness spots.

Leslie


response to Meadowlands

January 31, 2007

I very much enjoyed this book and i believe it is an excellent first book for the course.  This book is a broad overview of many environmental issues that this country and the world are facing even today, forty years after the book was written.  Sullivan is an easy writer to get into and has both a sarcastic, humorous side, and also a very thought-provoking side which draws readers into the topic at hand.  I think this is an important book for many groups of people to read, because many people (myself included) do not even know the Meadowlands exists; and for something as terrific as the meadowlands to be right under our noses and not even know it is quite an issue.   As I have read Desert Solitaire, I believe the Meadowlands is a perfect book to be the “opening act” for this more intense and serious read.

Dezaray