My amazing project idea(s)

January 31, 2007

1) My first project idea focuses on environmental art. This idea was inspired by a place called the Albany Landfill, a place I have never visited but have heard wonderful things about. It is a landfill that closed in the 80s (?), and after closing squatters began living there and turned the landfill into a gigantic art exhibit. The art they created is amazing, making it quite a shame that they were forced to leave Albany. But their art still remains. That is the story of the Albany Landfill in a nut shell…don’t want to tell you too much because then you won’t be interested in my presentation!

I originally thought of doing my project just on the Albany Landfill, but I decided to expand my horizons and focus on environmental/recycled art on the whole.

-http://www.mindfully.org/Reform/2005/Albany-Bulb-Bums-Paradise1aug05.htm

-http://greenmuseum.org/

-http://www.johndahlsen.com/

http://www.sculpture.org.uk/artists/AndyGoldsworthy

-DVD titled “Bum’s Paradise”-a documentary on the Albany Landfill

2) Well….I am pretty attached to idea #1….but I’ve managed to think of a back-up topic. Ecoterrorism. I got if off the sheet that Dr. Krygier gave us, it not as original as my first on…I didn’t think of it on my own. But ecoterrorism is very interesting and occurs in many different fashions, all of which would be quite exciting to learn about. But ecoterrorism is still a rather broad topic….so I think I’d have to narrow it down….maybe do it on major ecoterrorist groups/individuals through history…or some of the most devastating or CRAZY acts that those ecoterrorists performed. Or maybe I could do it on the negative effects that ecoterrorist acts have on the environment…I’m sure they’re doing SOMETHING to the environment, right? Here’s some sources:

-http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eco-terrorism

-http://www.adl.org/Learn/Ext_US/Ecoterrorism.asp

-http://faculty.ncwc.edu/TOConnor/429/429lect16.htm

-http://www.epa.gov/history/topics/foreign/03.htm

-http://www.parstimes.com/environment/persian_gulf_cr02.html

~Andra


Thoughts on Meadowlands

January 31, 2007

It amazes me how easily and perfectly Sullivan is able to portray the Meadowlands as a type of sacred wilderness area.  I bet people drive by the Meadowlands on their way to work every day and never think of them as beautiful, valuable or worth writing a book about.  But Sullivan uses a language and a style that, as Amanda pointed out, describe/portray the Meadowlands in a natural sense, similar to the way Abbey speaks of the Arches.  He uses terms that people would normally use in reference to nature, animals, plants and everything else that we associate with wilderness that is untouched and un-altered by man.  Sullivan brings out the beauty in the Meadowlands and other such places.  I’ll admit that before reading this book I would have been one of those people who’d drive through the Meadowlands and think nothing of them.  I feel enlightened. I may be jumping all around my point, or I may over-explaining…I never can tell.

The Meadowlands is a book that should definitely remain one of the books for this course.  I also think it should always be the book that Krygier presents, because it relates very well to his idea of sublime/sacred/wilderness.

~Andra


Green Energy Produced from Cow Waste

January 31, 2007

http://www.enn.com/archive.html?id=709&cat=biz

A new facility was built in Elk Mound, WI which will utilize cow waste to produce energy in an anaerobic digester system. Anaerobic bacteria will decompose the waste and other organic material, releasing methane gas that will be used to produce electricity. This type of facility is the first constructed in the U.S. ” In addition to producing renewable energy, anaerobic digesters are recognized as a solution to environmental and regulatory compliance issues related to animal waste disposal.” This method of “reusing” cow waste eliminates the need for storage or disposal, and the residue that remains after the bacteria is finished could be used as a fertilizer. This digester system is a renewable and alternative energy source which could remain efficient as long as there is cows or other organic elements that could be added to the digester. This is a source of energy production that more areas must look into before they decide to construct more coal fired power plants.

 ~Jeff


Google Earth

January 31, 2007

I really enjoy Google Earth so I decided to look fore placed in the book. I found
Moab, UT the town where Edward got his supplies. And the Cayonlands National Park, where Edward worked. It is hard to find very specific places from the book because the small valleys and trails do not have names that Google Earth recognizes. But you can look around the areas I have found and see if anything looks familiar.

The weblog does not let me post the actual files but ill give you the Longitude and latitude if you would like to look, and see how vast and desolate everything is good ahead, other than that I will bring them into class.

Moab, UT 38°34’20.21” N 109°33’.03.64”W

Cayonlands National Park 38°32’13.30”N 109°30’40.82”W


The Meadowlands – Review

January 31, 2007

I enjoyed the book very much. I found the book to evoke many questions about the definition of “wilderness”. The first day of class we discussed this definition, and most of us came to a general consensus about the definition, forest, wild, no people, etc. This book was a good choice for a first book because it was a good way to follow up on our discussion. After the idea of wilderness in our minds the book widened that initial definition to places that still fit our original definition but in an unusual way.

Personally I thought the chapters where the author went on an adventure were the most exciting and most enjoyable to read but; it was still interesting to ready about the bazaar history of the meadowlands area. Along with the book being entertaining I found it very educating, I did not know this place existed before reading this book and now I am curious to find out more. More of our population needs to be aware of areas like this that are treated with such disrespect. I’m sure most of the people of
New York City don’t know about what happens in the meadowlands or if it even exists. Personally I would to find out more about similar places closer to home and school.


Comments on Meadowlands: Aashrai Sarin

January 31, 2007

     Overall, I found “The Meadowlands,” to be quite an educating book. It never really occured to me that such a reason could be clssified as wilderness. But after reading it and comparing it to definitions we had read, I believe we could consider the Meadowlands to be such a reason. With all the unknowns and its kind of out of control state, the region could well suit the definitions. The book also gives for education through a more interesting than textbook outlook. The author captivates us with real life events and stories without failing to address the true facts. Thus keeping the reader captivated and entertained throughout.

     One of the articles presented stressed alot on religion. Through out the discourse I was quite displeased by this dependence on explainations through external forces. But at the same time I did agree alot with the psychological aspect of incorporating the wilderness into our daily lives, spent in concrete jungles. It was also not easy for me to accept the harsh truth that it is necessary for areas like the Meadowlands to exist for the efficient functioning of our society and world.

-Aash.


project ideas

January 31, 2007

Look at construction on top of landfills. steps that have to be taken. What effects can be suspected of happening due to this. Costs of construction and so on.